“Let food by thy medicine.” ~ Hippocrates

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Buddha Bowls
posted January 17th, 2022


I am a curious person by nature. I started thinking about a post with recipes for the popular Buddha Bowls, naturally, I had to find out why they were called that. Martha Stewart is credited with being the first person to use ‘Buddha Bowl’ in print in her 2013 book, Meatless. Up until that time they were called ‘Hippie Bowls’ or ‘Grain Bowls’.

Buddha Bowls: Origin.

The idea of having a personal eating bowl that has protein, grains, vegetables & a condiment has been around for a very long time, mostly in Asia & Hawaii. Each culture has a different name for it & different ingredients. But why Buddha Bowl? There are many guesses about this.

This is the one I found the most likely. Each morning Buddha would take his bowl & walk through the villages accepting bits of food that the people offered him. This was a way for the villagers to give a Spiritual offering, they didn’t consider it an act of charity. His bowl would be filled with a variety of protein, grains & vegetables; whatever the villagers could spare. Buddha would end up with a balanced meal! Balance is an important concept in Buddhism. The practice, which is over 2,000 years old, continues today with Buddhist Nuns & Monks in many countries.

Sources:

Each of these articles has a unique take on the origin of Buddha Bowls.

Buddha Bowls: No rules 🙂

Buddha Bowls should contain a balanced meal. There are no rules on what ingredients to place in your Buddha bowl. There is a general rule that it should contain protein, greens & a grain. You can build your own recipe based on what you like. It can be a combination of ingredients from any culture; Mexican, Italian, or Asian for example.

You can begin by using the following recipes as a guide. Then go crazy! Be creative & have fun.

Buddha Bowls: Recipes.

  • ForksOverKnives: How to Make a Buddha Bowl. By Mary Margaret Chappell, Jan 15, 2020 This is the perfect way to learn how to put together a healthy, WFPB Buddha Bowl. Good information that cover the basic ingredients plus some sauce ideas. It includes a list of recipes.
  • EatPlantBased: Vegan Bowl Recipes (Vegan & Oil-Free). By Terri Edwards. Information about the different ingredients she prefers & the various condiments/sauces that you can add to make that perfect Buddha Bowl.
  • Love & Lemons: Best Buddha Bowl Recipe. “The ultimate nutrient-packed vegan buddha bowl! Fresh veggies, beans, sauerkraut, and a vibrant turmeric tahini sauce make it hearty and flavorful.” This is a very different, flavorful bowl. Look at those ingredients! Sauerkraut is a favorite of mine.
  • MinimalistBaker: Sweet Potato Chickpea Buddha Bowl.This one is made with our favorite ingredients. Sweet potatoes & chicpeas. Yum!
  • Not enough ideas? VeganFoodandLiving: 23 vegan Buddha bowl recipes for healthy vegan dinners. Author: Rachel Smith

Eating a balanced meal was never easier using the Buddha Bowl idea. We need bigger bowls! Until next time…Mary 🙂

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January Nutrition Nuggets
posted January 10th, 2022

January’s Nutrition Nuggets include a new study that links the Keto diet to long-term health risks; reasons to get your vitamin C & the top nutrition trends for 2022. A few of my readers think that I am picking on the Keto diet. Not so. Giving you up-to-date scientific-based information about any diet, trend, or food that may have harmful side effects is my only objective.

January Nutrition Nugget: Keto diet.

Forks Over Knives: New Study Links Keto Diet to Severe Long-Term Health Risks. By Megan Edwards Sep 3, 2021. The study is a meta-analysis. Over 100 studies on the Keto diet were looked at by physicians, researchers & dieticians. Their goal was to determine the long-term health effects on the dieters. The bottom line was that people on very low-carb diets have an increased risk for heart disease, an increase in their LDL cholesterol, kidney failure, Alzheimer’s, diabetes, some cancers et al. A very low-carb diet is not the only problem, the omission of healthy food groups such as fruits, grains & some vegetables also contributes to the long-term health effects. I suggest that you peruse the actual study.

This is the study that the above article is referring to. Frontiers in Nutrition: Ketogenic Diets and Chronic Disease: Weighing the Benefits Against the Risks. July 16, 2021

For more information about the history & use of the Keto diet take a look at my post from August 20, 2019. Ketogenic Diet Update

January Nutrition Nugget: Vitamin C.

Including information about Vitamin C is important during the colder months of the year. We are more susceptible to colds, flu & Covid. Vitamin C does not cure any of these but it does help to boost your immune system.

Vitamin C is an antioxidant. Our bodies do not make Vitamin C, it must come from our diet. Most people can get enough vitamin C from the fruits & vegetables in their diet; citrus fruits, berries, potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, & spinach are all great sources.

  • EcoWatch: 7 Essential Health Benefits of Vitamin CTiffany Chaney Dec 27, 2021. Excellent article.
  • NIH: Vitamin C, Fact Sheet for Consumers. This is a great overview of Vitamin C. It covers the RDA for Vitamin C, the benefit, & symptoms of a deficiency in C. Very informative.
  • Oregon State University; Linus Pauling Institute: Vitamin C. For a more comprehensive look at Vitamin C & the studies for specific uses, this is the best site. It includes a section on IV Vitamin C for cancer patients for those of you who are interested.

 

January Nutrition Nugget: Top Nutrition Trends for 2022.

Each year companies take a big chance on what the newest trends in clothing, nutrition, etc. will be. It is always interesting to take a look at what the ‘experts’ think. What are the top trends in nutrition for 2022? The pandemic has influenced all of them as I would have predicted it would.

  • The internet is the new Cookbook. So true! Google a recipe, check Pinterest, Instagram or any other social media. I do this everytime I realize that I need to use the cauliflower or zuchini & need some inspiration 🙂 For Google start your search with the initials WFPB. You can even include no added oil. Love the internet!
  • Plant-based diets are becoming more popular due to their health benefits for people & the planet. This is a win, win situation.
  • People are choosing fewer alcoholic drinks. The sale of alcohol-free beverages has increased. I have purchased alcohol free wine for special occasions. There are some very good brands.
  • Ordering take out food thru an app on our digital devices is very popular. This has given rise to what is termed “Ghost Kitchens**.” Essentially you will be ordering from an industrial or restuarant type kitchen not a restaurant or fast food place.
  • Immune boosting foods. This ties in with the vitamin C articles. We are more aware that eating a balanced, plant-forward diet will boost our immune systems.

**The Conversation: What’s a Ghost KitchenBy Jeffrey Miller, Associate Professor of Hospitality Management, Colorado State University

Top Trends: My resources.

 

New Possibility?

This is a very interesting article about how foods become luxury items over time. The first example they use is lobster. At one time it was a humble food. As you read through the article you will see that we may be facing higher prices on foods such as chocolate, coffee & spices! All staples in my house. What will cause this? Climate change. BBC: The everyday foods that could become luxuries. By Isabelle Gerretsen, 26th September 2021


Hope you learned something new in my Nutrition Nuggets. For me, the future for plant-based or plant-forward diets is expanding which is a positive for both us & the planet. Until next time…Mary 🙂

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Soup Season!
posted January 3rd, 2022


I know I said I would be back on January 10th. Weather & the new COVID variant changed that. So here I am with new recipes for soup season!

As I am writing this, on December 27th, big snowflakes are coming down outside my window. It is 38 degrees out. This is notable because I live 2 blocks from the coast in the far northwestern corner of California! The snow is not sticking but it is a beautiful sight to behold. It also makes me think of soup season 🙂 Getting out my soup pot right now & deciding which soup to have for dinner.

Soup Season!

We love soups. My husband likes creamy soup & I like chunky soup. There are so many great WFPB recipes for both types to choose from. Here are just a few.

  • This is the soup I ended up making for dinner. I like the recipe because it doesn’t use coconut milk for the creaminess. The Simple Veganista: Creamy Vegan Potato Leek Soup. I added 4 cloves of garlic minced, 2 Tabsp. of White Miso in the water instead of broth, & sauteed in water omitting the oil. I also added Chili Powder to up the flavor. Using my emersion blender I was able to have it mostly creamy with some chunks for me 🙂
  • Center for Nutritional Studies: 12 Satisfying Plant-Based Soup & Stew Recipe Ideas By Evelisse Capó, PharmD, December 14, 2021 A great lineup of healthy soups.
  • Center for Nutritional Studies: Vegan French Onion Soup. By Terri Edwards I absolutely adore French Onion Soup! This is a wonderful recipe by Terri Edwards. Recognise her name? Visit her website, which happens to be my favorite! EatPlant-Based.com.
  • Forks Over Knives: Soups! Slow Cooker Pea Soup caught my eye. Maybe with cornbread?
  • Dr. McDougall Health & Medical Center: Soups. The Soba Miso Soup is really tasty.
  • HummuSapien: The Yummiest Vegetable Soup, Jun 28, 2021 · by Alexis Joseph This is my favorite Vegetable Soup recipe. You can add just about anything to it if you want. The basic recipe is full of flavor! As usual I substitute the oil for broth to saute in. There is a note at the end of the recipe with instructions for an InstantPot. She has other soup recipes as well.

Soup Season! Breads.

A hot piece of bread is always welcome with soup. It isn’t difficult to find bread that is WFPB without added oil & sugar; Ezekiel is my favorite. Take a look at their products; Ezekiel. They have a wide range. Nearly every store stocks some of them, usually in the frozen foods area.

I enjoy making my own when I have time.


Happy New Year! Enjoy a warm bowl of soup & a chunk of healthy, homemade bread this evening. Until next time…Mary 🙂

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New Year’s Resolutions
posted December 20th, 2021

It is time to start thinking about those New Years Resolutions again. This is a yearly global ritual. Literally, millions of people set their goals for the year on New Year’s eve. How did you do with last year’s? I was curious to see if making resolutions for 2021 in the U.S., differed from previous years due to the pandemic. What are the top resolutions? What percentage are actually kept? Who makes these resolutions by gender. Are there some strategies that would help us keep them? Let’s consider these questions.

New Year’s Resolution: Statistics.

Most of the sites I looked at for statistics had the same data results or were very close. I chose this one to share with you. Finder: New Years Resolution Statistics. By Catherine Choi, Dec 4, 2020

The data came from 2020. The author was wondering the same thing I was; did the pandemic have an effect on our resolutions? 74% of adults in the U.S said that they were determined to make resolutions for 2021. This was an increase of 15% from 2020. I think that shows that the pandemic did have an effect on most of us to make 2021 a fitter year.

According to Ms. Choi’s data, these in order, are the top resolutions. It distresses me that money comes before family & love. I am not surprised that health was the #1 concern. It is also interesting that career is last & money is 3rd. Take a look at her chart to see the percentages.

  1. Health
  2. Self Improvement
  3. Money
  4. Family
  5. Love
  6. Career

Gender.

Ms. Choi found that 73.76% of men and 74.26% of women made resolutions. Close to 50/50. The top concern for both was health. She also breaks down the data by generation if you are interested. Thought-provoking.

Failure?

About 25% of those who made resolutions either didn’t think they could meet their goals or were unsure if they could. That statistic is much lower than I expected. I checked other sites & their polls had similar results. Laziness & forgetfulness were at the top of the list for why they didn’t meet the goals they set.

Be sure and look at Ms. Coi’s article. I happen to like perusing statistics. I find them fascinating.

New Year’s Resolution: Strategies.

I stopped making resolutions at the new year many years ago. It seemed to me that each year I was setting myself up for failure. I was aiming too high & beating myself up for not attaining the goals I set. Instead, deciding to come up with one positive goal at a time at different intervals during the year made all the difference. Each goal was one that I knew I could attain & I gave myself permission to ‘delete’ it if it wasn’t meeting my needs at the time.

Since this is a nutrition site let’s take a look at diet strategies. The overall goal for the year should be to become healthier. This goal should be well thought out before New Year’s eve 🙂 That single goal would encompass lifestyle changes. During the year you would take on one strategy at a time. Be realistic & set goals that you know with certainty you can reach. Making changes is a process & won’t happen overnight. Review your goals during the year & see how you are doing.

Stratagies/Goals.

I believe that the most important & useful strategy is to start where you are & go slowly! You don’t have to become a triathlete this year & you don’t need to become a vegan either. Take a look at your lifestyle & be honest with yourself. What do you need to change? Don’t make the same resolutions that you made year after year. Very bad idea 🙁

Here are a few ideas:

  1. How many meals do you have that are from a fast food place? If its 3 times a week or more then cut back to 1 time a week. This is not only healthier but it saves you money for healthier choices.
  2. Take a look in your pantry. How many packages of processed foods do you use? Decide which ones you could either do without completely or you could find a healthier version of. Replace them one at a time.
  3. Start adding more fresh fruits & vegetables to your meals. Make them your go-to snacks. Clean & cut them up to have on hand in the refrigerator. This site has great ideas that anyone can use: EcoWatch: 8 Easy Vegan Meal Prep Ideas. By Paige Bennett Dec. 10, 2021 
  4. Start where you are & go slowly! Do you eat meat/fish with at least one meal a day? Is meat in your diet is important to you? Okay, no problem. Cook smaller portions. Don’t fry it; bake or roast it. Make it 25% or less of your plate. Make a vegetarian/vegan meal once a week & see how that makes you feel. Go slowly!
  5. You already know my views on alcohol consumption. As a new reader, take a gander at my latest post on the subject: Alcohol & Breast Cancer, November 8, 2021.
  6. Harvard Health, below under resources, mentioned something I hadn’t thought of; “Understand why you shouldn’t make a change”. Understanding why you are clinging to a certain belief, lifestyle or habit is extremely important. Is it something that you just can’t change right now? Then don’t. Another reason why you need to think about & plan out your goals before you yell Happy New Year 🙂

 

Helpful resources.

 

New Year’s Resolution: Weight Loss

I only have one thing to say about this resolution; don’t make it! Weight loss should not be the main goal. Becoming healthier is the main goal. Work on being the healthiest you can be & weight loss will follow without you even thinking about it. I promise 🙂


Have a safe & happy holiday season. I will be back in the New Year, on January 10th, with a new post for you. I will continue posting recipes & information on our Facebook page! Click on the Icon above. Until then…Mary 🙂

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Holiday Baking
posted December 13th, 2021

Holiday baking time! Holidays are fun to bake for. There are so many healthy WFPB recipes for bread, cakes, cookies & even candies. I must admit that I enjoy coming up with healthier ways to bake our favorites!

Holiday Baking: Bread.

Bread is one of my favorites to bake for friends & neighbors. There are so many to choose from! Sometimes I will make several at once & freeze them for later.

  • One Green Planet: 10 Sweet and Seasonal Eggless Dairy-Free Breads to Enjoy During the Holiday Season The very first recipe had me hooked; Pumpkin Spice & Oat Loaf.
  • The Simple Veganista: Favorite cranberry Orange Bread. I make a cranberry orange sauce for holiday meals & the flavors are wonderful together. I would swap out the cane sugar for date sugar, date paste or maple syrup. Dates have a natural sugar & fiber. Don’t miss the other quick bread recipes that she has links to.
  • The Healthy Kitchen: VEGAN APPLE BREAD [OIL FREE], Published: Sep 2, 2020  by Rosa Her instructions are not to be missed. Lots of good information on substitute ingredients & variations on the basic recipe. I love the idea of a Cinnamon swirl!
  • Make It Dairy Free: VEGAN CINNAMON QUICK BREAD, March 11, 2020 by LarishaBernardTHIS DELICIOUS AND NO YEAST VEGAN CINNAMON QUICK BREAD TASTES LIKE SNICKERDOODLES FOR BREAKFAST! EASY TO MAKE AND PERFECT FOR ON THE GO! Anything that tastes like snickerdoodles has to be good!

 

Holiday Baking: Cookies.

Cookies are another favorite of mine. The problem is they are too easy to snack on! To help with that I freeze 3/4 of them & then take out only what I needed. I know what you are thinking right now; a cup of hot coffee & a frozen cookie is a perfect snack. Your right, it is. 🙂

  • EatPlantBased: 50 Amazing Vegan Christmas Cookies. By Terri Edwards, December 8, 2021 An amazing group of yummy recipes! Check out the Ginger Bread Men. So cute! The Vegan Peanut Butter cookies are so simple. I am going to make a batch today. Raining & cold right now. I need that coffee & cookie fix 🙂
  • Take a look at my post from 2020: WFPB Christmas Cookies. I explain how to upgrade your cherished recipe to a healthier one. Recipes with added oil & without added oil are listed.
  • Another post of mine from 2019: Healthier Holiday Baking.

 

Holiday Baking: Cakes.

Cakes always look so pretty when presented. You can add pretty edible flowers on top of them or decorate them with a holiday theme.

 

Holiday Baking: Candies.

My mother would make candies for the holidays. Of course my brother & I loved buttering up our hands to pull taffy! I was always intimitaded by the candy making process. These recipes are very simple to make. The only cooking is to slowly melt the chocolate in two of them. No thermometer needed & no hot sugar flying all over the kitchen 🙂

  • EatPlantBased: Stuffed Dates: Easy 2-Ingredient Dessert. By Terri Edwards, August 27, 2021. This recipe comes in handy for all occasions. They are easy to make for that last minute snack or dessert. I add a scoop of nut butter & then put the walnut or other raw nut on top. Lots of ways to dress this up.
  • EatPlantBased: Vegan Chocolate Tootsie RollsBy Terri Edwards, October 18, 2021. Haven’t tried this recipe yet. It would be a good one for gifting.
  • This is my very favorite candy recipe. You will love how simple it is & how healthy! Beaming Baker: 2 Ingredient Chocolate Peanut Butter Vegan Fudge Recipe. Oct 29, 2020 · by Demeter | Beaming Baker I use my homemade peanut butter; nothing added. The chocolate can be vegan dark chocolate chips, vegan mint chips or any other vegan chocolate chip that you like.
  • Elana’s Pantry: 3-Ingredient Low-Carb Fudge. December 21, 2020. The ingredients are simple; chocolate, coconut milk & vanilla. Easy to make & very creamy. I brought this to a gathering & it stayed firm when in a cooler with a couple of ice packs. Same for the recipe above.

Start baking & freezing all those wonderful holiday treats. Until next time…Mary 

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The Generous Cauliflower
posted December 6th, 2021

Cauliflower is another versatile vegetable in the WFPB way of eating. It was never a favorite of mine until I became vegan & started experimenting with new recipes. Cauliflower can be roasted, steamed, stirfried, or even grated. Now I use it as a main course, a side dish, in soups, sauces & even sneak it into baked goods! Let’s begin with how nutritious it is.

The Generous Cauliflower: Nutrition Facts

Cauliflower: 1 cup chopped/about 107 grams. USDA Food Central Data

Calories 26.8 calories
Protein 2.05 grams
Fat 0.3 grams
Carbohydrates 5.32 grams
Fiber 2.14 grams
Sugar 2.04 grams
Sodium 32.1 mg
Calcium 23.5 mg
Magnesium 16.0 mg
Potasium 320.0 mg
Vitamin B6 0.197 mcg
Vitamin C 51.6 mg
Vitamin K 16.6 µg
USDA Food Data Central

Health Benefits.

Cauliflower is a cruciferous vegetable like Brussels Sprouts, Kale, Cabbage & Broccoli to name a few. They all share the same health benefits. Tired of white cauliflower? What about purple, green or orange? They all have the same health benefits & the same mild, nutty taste.

Adding cauliflower to your plant-based diet can decrease the risk of obesity, heart disease, diabetes & some cancers.

The Generous Cauliflower: Main Dish

For the main dish, I like to either roast the cauliflower florets along with other vegetables on a sheet pan, roast the whole cauliflower, or cut it into ‘streaks’. Here are some other ideas.

  • We love curry & this recipe is our favorite. Minimalist Baker: 1-Pot Yellow Chickpea Cauliflower Curry The recipe makes a lot so it can be eaten again later in the week. We enjoy it on rice, buckwheat, noodles or even baked potatoes.
  • This is a wonderful recipe. I like her ideas for different marinades. BBQ Sauce would be my husbands choice 🙂 I would omit the oils in the marinades & either replace it with broth or tahini. My leftovers usually end up in a taco or a wrap by the end of the week. Veggie Desserts: WHOLE ROASTED CAULIFLOWER WITH GARLIC AND PAPRIKA. Aug 10, 2021 by Kate Hackworthy 
  • Most of these recipes can be served as your main dish. Forks Over Knives: 20 Tasty Vegan Cauliflower Recipes
  • The Simple Veganista: Blackened Roasted Cauliflower Steaks Again I omit the oil & use tahini or just moisten the ‘steaks’ with broth to add the seasonings.

As a Side Dish

Two side dishes that we eat a lot are Riced Cauliflower & Mashed Cauliflower Potatoes. Both are so versatile. You can add anything you want to them. Raw cauliflower florets in salads or dipped into a sauce are other ideas for side dishes.

The Generous Cauliflower: Soups

In Sauces.

My husband is a big sauce fan. I am not. It is nice to have these WFPB options that he can put on his veggies 🙂

  • Plant Based Recipe: Creamy Cauliflower Garlic Recipe. Who doesn’t love a creamy GARLIC sauce! So many ways to use this recipe.
  • Alfredo Sauce is another favorite most people changing to vegan miss. Enjoy this version! Plant You: Vegan Cauliflower Alfredo Sauce (Nut Free, Gluten Free & Oil Free). Posted by CARLEIGH on DECEMBER 8, 2020 
  • Another version that uses white beans. In case you aren’t aware of this trick, white beans are used in a lot of wfpb sauces for the creamy texture. You can substitute white beans for all or half of the cashews some recipes call for. Simple-Veganista: WHITE BEAN & CAULIFLOWER ALFREDO (VEGAN + HEALTHY). “White Bean & Cauliflower Alfredo featuring high protein white beans and cauliflower, blended into a creamy vegan Alfredo sauce that is just an all around awesome sauce!”
  • I am including this recipe because it would be perfect for tacos, baked potatoes or falafels. SavorySpin: Cauliflower Jalapeño Vegan Sauce By: Author Shashi, Last updated: June 24, 2021.
  • Forks Over Knives: Cauliflower Bechamel Sauce. By Del Sroufe, Nov 14, 2012 I haven’t tried this one yet but will definately add it to my to-make list.

The Generous Cauliflower: Baking

Some of these recipes call for oil. You can substitute tahini, apple sauce, pumpkin puree, avocado, or nut butter for the oil.


The Generous Cauliflower
posted December 6th, 2021

Cauliflower is another versatile vegetable in the WFPB way of eating. It was never a favorite of mine until I became vegan & started experimenting with new recipes. Cauliflower can be roasted, steamed, stirfried, or even grated. Now I use it as a main course, a side dish, in soups, sauces & even sneak it into baked goods! Let’s begin with how nutritious it is.

The Generous Cauliflower: Nutrition Facts

Cauliflower: 1 cup chopped/about 107 grams. USDA Food Central Data

Calories 26.8 calories
Protein 2.05 grams
Fat 0.3 grams
Carbohydrates 5.32 grams
Fiber 2.14 grams
Sugar 2.04 grams
Sodium 32.1 mg
Calcium 23.5 mg
Magnesium 16.0 mg
Potasium 320.0 mg
Vitamin B6 0.197 mcg
Vitamin C 51.6 mg
Vitamin K 16.6 µg
USDA Food Data Central

Health Benefits.

Cauliflower is a cruciferous vegetable like Brussels Sprouts, Kale, Cabbage & Broccoli to name a few. They all share the same health benefits. Tired of white cauliflower? What about purple, green or orange? They all have the same health benefits & the same mild, nutty taste.

Adding cauliflower to your plant-based diet can decrease the risk of obesity, heart disease, diabetes & some cancers.

The Generous Cauliflower: Main Dish

For the main dish, I like to either roast the cauliflower florets along with other vegetables on a sheet pan, roast the whole cauliflower, or cut it into ‘streaks’. Here are some other ideas.

  • We love curry & this recipe is our favorite. Minimalist Baker: 1-Pot Yellow Chickpea Cauliflower Curry The recipe makes a lot so it can be eaten again later in the week. We enjoy it on rice, buckwheat, noodles or even baked potatoes.
  • This is a wonderful recipe. I like her ideas for different marinades. BBQ Sauce would be my husbands choice 🙂 I would omit the oils in the marinades & either replace it with broth or tahini. My leftovers usually end up in a taco or a wrap by the end of the week. Veggie Desserts: WHOLE ROASTED CAULIFLOWER WITH GARLIC AND PAPRIKA. Aug 10, 2021 by Kate Hackworthy 
  • Most of these recipes can be served as your main dish. Forks Over Knives: 20 Tasty Vegan Cauliflower Recipes
  • The Simple Veganista: Blackened Roasted Cauliflower Steaks Again I omit the oil & use tahini or just moisten the ‘steaks’ with broth to add the seasonings.

As a Side Dish

Two side dishes that we eat a lot are Riced Cauliflower & Mashed Cauliflower Potatoes. Both are so versatile. You can add anything you want to them. Raw cauliflower florets in salads or dipped into a sauce are other ideas for side dishes.

The Generous Cauliflower: Soups

In Sauces.

My husband is a big sauce fan. I am not. It is nice to have these WFPB options that he can put on his veggies 🙂

  • Plant Based Recipe: Creamy Cauliflower Garlic Recipe. Who doesn’t love a creamy GARLIC sauce! So many ways to use this recipe.
  • Alfredo Sauce is another favorite most people changing to vegan miss. Enjoy this version! Plant You: Vegan Cauliflower Alfredo Sauce (Nut Free, Gluten Free & Oil Free). Posted by CARLEIGH on DECEMBER 8, 2020 
  • Another version that uses white beans. In case you aren’t aware of this trick, white beans are used in a lot of wfpb sauces for the creamy texture. You can substitute white beans for all or half of the cashews some recipes call for. Simple-Veganista: WHITE BEAN & CAULIFLOWER ALFREDO (VEGAN + HEALTHY). “White Bean & Cauliflower Alfredo featuring high protein white beans and cauliflower, blended into a creamy vegan Alfredo sauce that is just an all around awesome sauce!”
  • I am including this recipe because it would be perfect for tacos, baked potatoes or falafels. SavorySpin: Cauliflower Jalapeño Vegan Sauce By: Author Shashi, Last updated: June 24, 2021.
  • Forks Over Knives: Cauliflower Bechamel Sauce. By Del Sroufe, Nov 14, 2012 I haven’t tried this one yet but will definately add it to my to-make list.

The Generous Cauliflower: Baking

Some of these recipes call for oil. You can substitute tahini, apple sauce, pumpkin puree, avocado, or nut butter for the oil.


The lowly cauliflower has been upgraded to The Generous Cauliflower! I hope you have fun trying out some of these recipes. I did. Until next time…Mary 🙂

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November Nutrition Nuggets
posted November 22nd, 2021

Time for my Nutrition Nuggets. I have collected several interesting articles for you. Are you a cheese addict? What are protein isolates? Who should be learning more about WFPB nutrition? I have the answers to these questions & Bonus recipes! Read on.

November Nutrition Nuggets: Cheese addiction.

I can really relate to this article. I grew up eating chunks of aged cheddar cheese, salami & Italian bread. It was my father’s favorite lunch & snack. My younger brother & I would go with him to pick up each item at specialty stores in Los Angeles. He would buy extra so we could eat it on our drive home; 45 minutes. Nothing like a chunk of hot, fresh out of the oven Italian bread in one hand & cheese in the other! The cheese was the most difficult food for me to give up when we switched from being vegetarian to a WFPB vegan diet. Now I know why 🙂

Salt, grease & opiates! That’s why. ForksOverKnives: Why It’s So Hard to Give Up CheeseBy Neal Barnard, MD, FACC The article says that after cheese the most difficult to give up are chips, chocolate, cookies & ice cream! Does anyone out there care to dispute that fact? I thought not. I no longer crave cheese. It just looks like a lump of stretchy fat now. But I must admit that I don’t dare taste it 🙂

November Nutrition Nuggets: Protein Isolates.

Protein isolates are used in vegan meat alternatives. The following article discusses whether or not the use of them is a problem or not. As the author states at the beginning of the article, protein isolates are simply the isolation of the protein found in whole foods. You are probably more familiar with protein powders made from soy or peas.

Center for Nutrition Studies: Protein Isolates: Do They Have a Place in a Whole Food, Plant-Based Diet? By Theresa “Sam” HoughtonOctober 27, 2021 The bottom line as I see it is that the use of meat alternatives to help meat eaters to transition to a plant-forward or plant-based diet is a good thing. Long term it is not the healthiest option.

November Nutrition Nuggets: WFPB education.

Dr. Greger is one of my favorite sources of nutrition information. His opinions are based on research studies. This is a very good article. PlantBasedNews: We Need More Hospitals With 100% Plant-Based Menus, Says Top Doctor. by Emily Baker, 7th October 2021. Medical students leave school ‘de-educated’, says Dr. Greger, when it’s ‘about time’ doctors help create a healthier society

Hopefully, this program, Rooting for Wellness, will be a prototype for other medical schools. ForksOverKnives: How Wayne State’s Medical School Became the First in the U.S. to Require Plant-Based Nutrition Education, By Megan Edwards Oct 27, 2021. I especially liked what the author quoted at the end of the article; “I think the students appreciated that we designed the curriculum to help make them a more holistic and informed physician instead of just preparing them to pass their next board exam,” said Lakshman Mulpuri. He is the co-founder of the program & also a student.

November Nutrition Nuggets: Global concern

I added this short article to show you how improving one’s health thru a plant-based diet is a global concern. Amsterdam is looking at banning fast food near & in schools. Their goal is to have residents eating 60% plant-based by 2040. PlantBasedNews: Amsterdam Residents Urged To Go 50% Plant-Based By 2030, by Emily Baker, 19th October 2021. “Policymakers in the region are considering the ban to help with climbing figures of overweight individuals.

The move to a healthier, plant-based diet is not just a small vegan activist movement, it is an international concern. I found this article intriguing. I lived in Germany for 2 years in the 1970s & for 4 years in the 1980s. Europe was a meat-eaters paradise & very difficult for a vegetarian to eat out. Big changes have occurred since then. Chef’s Pencil: Most Popular Countries and Cities for Vegans in 2020 (Jan-2021 Update), Jan 5th, 2021 by Chef’s Pencil Staff.

This is also promising. VegNews: UN ENDORSES CALL FOR A GLOBAL SHIFT TO A PLANT-BASED DIET. By ANNA STAROSTINETSKAYA, FEBRUARY 8, 2021 “A report released ahead of the UN climate conferences in 2021 urges world leaders to shift away from the “cheaper food paradigm” and toward encouraging plant-based diets.”

Food For Thought.

I read a BBC article many years ago about how a city in England stopped the children from leaving the school at lunchtime. They encouraged a healthy lunch to be brought in by the students or they could eat a healthy lunch at the school cafeteria. The photo with the article showed mothers throwing bags of fast food over the fence to their children! I dug up this article in the BBC Archives to illustrate how difficult it is to change anyone’s way of eating without educating both the parents & the children first. The junk food smugglers, By Brendan O’Neill,17 May 06.

Bonus!

  • EatPlant-Based: 6 Amazing Vegan Cheese Recipes. We enjoy her recipe for a grilled cheese sandwich using her Easy Cashew Cheese | Mozzarella, By AuthorTerri Edwards, August 27, 2021. It is very good. We also like her other cheese recipes.
  • TheSimpleVeganista: BAKED VEGAN MAC AND CHEESE (+ STOVETOP). “Winner, Winner… Baked Vegan Mac and Cheese Dinner! This dairy-free, creamy vegan mac and cheese recipe is absolutely delicious, and SO easy to make. It’s a family favorite and I’m sure it will become yours too!” Definitely our favorite!
  • Buying vegan cheese can be daunting. Most of them use some kind of oil. If that isn’t a problem for you then you will enjoy this article. Live Kindly: These Are the 10 Best Vegan Cheese Brands According to Cheese Snobs (Hi), By AUDREY ENJOLI
  • Wow! These are fantastic recipes all in one place! I batch cook my favorites & freeze them for those days I need a quick meal. Cheaper & healthier than buying them. PlantBasedandBroke.com: 28 Plant-Based Burger Recipes. “Grab your buns – we’re making plant-based burgers! With gluten-free, oil-free soy-free, high protein, and low-calorie options!

Wishing you all a Happy Day of Thanks. I will be taking the week off. My next blog post will be on December 6th. Until then: Mary 🙂

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A WFPB Thanksgiving
posted November 15th, 2021

Some of you may be new to a whole food plant-based way of eating. Your first thought when planning a WFPB Thanksgiving meal will probably be ‘No turkey? OMG, what do I do!’ No worries, there are many ways to replace a turkey. A word of caution though, WFPB recipes are not trying to replicate the taste of a roasted turkey. They are simply a new way of looking at the centerpiece of your meal.

My previous posts.

Here is a list of my previous Thanksgiving posts. In them, you will find a plethora of recipes from appetizers & soups to entrées & desserts, including cooking tips.

New WFPB Thanksgiving Recipes.

These are new recipes that are either not in my previous posts or are some of my all-time favorites.

EatPlant-Baed. Teri Edwards’ recipes have to be my favorites. They are so flavorful & are always a big hit with non-WFPB eaters. Our Holiday meal centerpiece will be her Perfect Vegan Roast | Seitan. Tastes amazing!

Forks Over Knives has a lot of good recipes to choose from. They also have a very nice App with recipes for both Apple & GooglePlay. It is $4.99 & worth the money.

WFPB Thanksgiving: New Websites

Not all of these recipes are ‘added oil-free’. You can omit it easily. Make sure that you explore these websites. Wonderful ideas & recipes.

These ideas should help you transform your Thanksgiving into a healthy meal. If you want to keep your traditional Turkey that’s fine. I understand how important tradition is, especially with food. Take a look at all the wonderful recipes above to go along with it. Until next time…Mary 🙂

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Alcohol & Breast Cancer
posted November 8th, 2021

My post: Guidelines on Alcohol ConsumptionSeptember 2, 2020, starts out as follows. For years I have wondered why the American Cancer Society would say that it is safe for women to limit their alcohol intake to 1 serving per day & men to 2 servings per day. To me, it was giving everyone permission to consume alcohol even when the research showed otherwise. Their newest guidelines on alcohol consumption are: “It is best not to drink alcohol. But if you do, women should have no more than 1 drink per day and men should have no more than 2. A drink is 12 ounces of regular beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits.” This is a step in the right direction but it still does not reflect current research on alcohol & cancer.

What I should have said is that it is NOT a step in the right direction. Current research shows that there is no safe amount of alcohol when it comes to cancer. Don’t jump to the conclusion that I am a teetotaler; someone who never drinks alcohol. I enjoy a glass of white wine or champagne on special occasions; but only then. The medical community applauded when the Tobacco link to cancer was proven. Why are they not applauding now the proven link between alcohol consumption & cancer?

Personal Story.

I gave a talk to a group of cancer patients about alcohol & cancer. This was in about 2013. The majority of the women present were in treatment for breast cancer. Before I began my talk I asked each of the 15 women to tell us about the role alcohol played in her life. I emphasized that we would not be judgemental. The answers given ranged from drinks with friends each weekend to what we would consider a problem drinker; drinking 3+ glasses of alcohol every night. After I spoke about the emerging evidence of alcohol’s link to breast cancer I asked each person if my talk would change their relationship with alcohol. 100% said NO! I was so surprised! I shouldn’t have been because I have received the same answer when asking about changing dietary habits to lower the risk of cancers.

Alcohol & Breast Cancer.

The article that caught my eye was on EuroNews.com: Alcohol is one of the biggest risks for breast cancer, warns World Health OrganizationBy Pascale Davies  •  Updated: 20/10/2021 This statement at the beginning of the article says it all: “Alcohol consumption is one of the “major modifiable risk factors” for the disease, the WHO said during Breast Cancer Awareness Month.” Did you catch that? A MAJOR MODIFIABLE RISK FACTOR. This is an important statement to absorb. You simply have to make a choice between alcohol & cancer.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer is quoted in the article. Their data showed that breast cancer has become the most common cancer internationally. They estimated there were over 2 million cases in the world in 2020 & about 100,000 of these cases were due to alcoholic drinks. This is a must-read article.

The second article I want to share is from NPR: Alcohol Use Linked To Over 740,000 Cancer Cases Last Year, New Study Says, By Susan BrinkJuly 16, 2021. This article discusses all cancers that can be attributed to alcohol consumption; esophageal, mouth, larynx, colon, rectum, liver & breast cancers. The author cites the study reported in The Lancet Oncology. The study is below for you to read.

The study.

The Lancet Oncology: Global burden of cancer in 2020 attributable to alcohol consumption: a population-based study, August 1, 2021

Alcohol & other cancers.

In my previous post, I wrote According to the National Cancer Institute, NIH’s fact sheet: Alcohol & Cancer Risk, “There is a strong scientific consensus that alcohol drinking can cause several types of cancer (12). In its Report on Carcinogens, the National Toxicology Program of the US Department of Health and Human Services lists consumption of alcoholic beverages as a known human carcinogen. The evidence indicates that the more alcohol a person drinks—particularly the more alcohol a person drinks regularly over time—the higher his or her risk of developing alcohol-associated cancer. Even light drinkers (those who have no more than one drink per day) and binge drinkers have a modestly increased risk of some cancers (37). Based on data from 2009, an estimated 3.5% of cancer deaths in the United States (about 19,500 deaths) were alcohol-related.”

Even people who drink no more than 1 alcoholic drink per day have a modest risk of cancer. In the above fact sheet, the NIH lists the following cancers affected by alcohol & how much you would need to drink to be at risk.

  • Head & Neck Cancer
  • Esophageal Cancer
  • Liver Cancer
  • Breast Cancer
  • Colorectal Cancer

There is also growing evidence that there is a risk of stomach, liver & kidney cancer with alcohol. Take a look at these statistics. World Cancer Research Fund/AICR: Alcohol Drinks & the Risk of Cancer.

This, like other lifestyle changes, are obviously a personal choice. To make an ‘informed choice’ it is essential to know the facts.

Bonus:

Keep in mind. Products labeled “nonalcoholic” in the USA may contain up to 0.5% alcohol by volume; some beers, wines, and kombuchas.

I am hoping that this new information is making you uncomfortable. And I hope it is causing you to look at your own alcohol intake. In the article from NPR that I cited, the authors mention that fewer than 1 in 3 Americans recognize the correlation between cancer & alcohol. Even if they did, I wonder how many would change their habits. Will you? Until next time…Mary 🙂

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Go to the posts of previous years:
Reality-Based Nutrition Archive 2021: January through October
Reality-Based Nutrition Archive 2020
Reality-Based Nutrition Archive 2019
Reality-Based Nutrition Archive 2018

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